eMentor Position Available at NTI: Apply Now!


eMentor Position Available at NTI: Apply Now!



Here at NTI, we have formed a Virtual eMentoring Services Program to support the recruiting, training and hiring process for candidates with disabilities towards job success. With this new program, we’re in need of eMentors/Job Coaches/Job Advisors who will report to our Associate Director of eMentoring Services. Position can be performed virtually or in our Boston, MA office.

The main responsibilities of this job include:
  • Committing to work a minimum of 25 hours per week
  • Connecting with and following a group of assigned mentees
  • Acting as a virtual resource and guide for your mentees via calls, emails, texts and/or Skype
  • Serving as an example/role model towards successful job placement
  • Following and guiding newly graduated candidates from NTI University through the various stages of the recruitment cycle
  • Assisting in resume writing
  • Role-playing for interviews
  • Offering dialogue around work accommodations

To thrive in this position, you must successfully pass through all NTI training processes in a timely manner. Plus, you must have a passion for guiding others to be successful in meeting  a goal and have solid self esteem and a clear speaking voice.

Skills/background required for this job:
  • Comprehensive communication skill set
  • Able to listen, share and teach with a high emotional IQ
  • Post-secondary education highly desirable
  • Background as a business professional, nurse, teacher or in human services, etc.
  • Technical ability to assist candidates with basic computer troubleshooting, learn new software, manage several databases and type at least 20 wpm.

Please note that there will be a background check.

Interested? Contact us today at www.nticentral.org/apply

Press Release - NTI Exhibits at Virtual Job Fair for People with Disabilities 5/18/2016

[Boston, MA] - NTI Exhibits at Virtual Job Fair for People with Disabilities
National Telecommuting Institute (NTI) will be an exhibitor at AbilityLink’s Virtual Job Fair online on Wednesday, May 18, 2016 from 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. CST.



The Virtual Job Fair brings together all job seekers with disabilities and employers that embrace diversity.
Free and open online to the public, this special virtual event allows attendees to meet representatives from a number of companies, including NTI, who want to help attendees find new jobs. About half of AbilityLinks job seekers are typically from Chicago, while the rest are from areas across the U.S. Exhibitors at the Virtual Job Fair include RR Donnelley; Northern Trust; Advocate Health Care; Presence Health; Benedictine University; and so many more.

Attendance is free, but pre-registration is advised at http://www.abilitylinks.org/jobPortal/VirtualJobMatchFair/default.aspx?PageID=1172 .

AbilityLinks is the nation's leading disability employment community where inclusive employers post jobs and search resumes, and job seekers who self-identify as having a disability can post resumes and apply for jobs. No information about disability type is asked. Skilled AbilityLinks Counselors, who also have a disability, provide information, referrals and the human touch!

National Telecommuting Institute, NTI was founded in 1995 as a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, NTI pursued a mission to identify and develop work-at-home jobs for home-based Americans who are physically disabled.

Since that time, NTI has provided trained work-at-home employees to some of the largest U.S. government agencies, Fortune 500 companies and to smaller businesses who want to outsource customer service and technical support operations in order to reduce costs.

Visit  www.nticentral.org/learnmore for more information about how NTI assists American veterans who are disabled in their job searches.

How Fibromyalgia Impacts One NTI Recruiter




Katherine Buenteo Calucci, mother of two, is a strong advocate for the practice of “mindfulness,” a meditative practice of paying close attention to the internal and external experiences occurring in the present moment. This “on-the-spot” experiential reflection has become a tool for her to use in managing her disabilities. She learned about mindfulness while doing research on coping strategies for bipolar disorder (BPD), her most challenging diagnosis.
“Nobody wants to admit they have a mental illness,” says Kathy. “However, I find most people tend to accept someone who states they have depression or anxiety, but no one wants to hear you have bipolar disorder. It’s like crossing an imaginary line someone created.” Since Kathy has the most challenging form of BPD — rapid-cycling Bipolar I — she finds mindfulness keeps her in tune with her environment; her emotions; her physical state; and her interconnectedness with the world around her. “Those of us who have BPD, are very empathetic beings, when we are in recovery,” continues Kathy. “It’s important that we listen to ourselves and those around us, because it’s so easy to forget or gloss over what a big impact our physical state and the emotional and physical state of those around us impacts our mental state.
Along with BPD, Kathy is managing the auto-immune disorders of rheumatoid arthritis and fibromyalgia. “These challenges keep me from doing some things, but not all things. I had to learn to keep moving and not let them paralyze me from doing the things I love and enjoy. That’s a lesson I learned from my kids.” Kathy has a 19-year-old son and a 13-year-old daughter. “If it wasn’t for them, I would have given up a long time ago. I know it’s cliché, but they truly are my inspiration.”
Five years ago, Kathy was working in a career field she had for almost 25 years as the director of a college academic advising center for the biggest college at a state university. She loved the work, her team, her colleagues and, most of all, her students. But the stress of her position began to have an effect on Kathy’s health. “It began slowly,” recalls Kathy. “I was waking up feeling exhausted with my joints hurting. I just thought it was age and that everyone goes through this. But then it slowly became a state of being. I worked in pain and was so tired that I had no energy to do anything when I came home. It was very hard on my family.” And it took its toll on her marriage. “I spent days in bed, depressed, barely existing, and my husband had to pick up all the slack,” says Kathy. She’s now in the process of a divorce. “Other days I was so manic; I was hardly recognizable,” continues Kathy. “And those days also took a toll on my body. You’re like an Energizer bunny, not wanting to stop and engaging in behaviors counter-productive to maintaining a healthy lifestyle. But you literally do not care about the consequences and you certainly don’t care about the feelings of those close to you. It’s probably one of the hardest things to do after a bipolar episode; picking up the pieces of the chaos you created.” 
 
Kathy’s body literally just gave out. There were several things that happened to her to indicate she was
about to shut down, both physically and emotionally, so she left her position. As she looks back, she sees, as hard as it was to do so, this was the first step she took toward recovery and management of her disorders. Five hospital stays (three of which were for her bipolar disorder) and several doctors later, Kathy is finally at a point where she feels she can take a breath. “But I can’t get complacent,” says Kathy. “I have to stay on top of my conditions and it’s a struggle sometimes, especially with my mental illness. It deceives you and lets you believe the rules don’t apply to you.”
She considers herself lucky most days because she has the love of her family, two healthy and happy kids, and she was lucky enough to be hired by NTI, Inc. “I was actually shocked when I received a call asking if I wanted to apply for an Associate Recruiter position,” recalls Kathy. “I was so flattered and excited about the opportunity, but nervous, too. I had to step back and evaluate whether I could really do the job and meet their expectations.”
After being hired and embarking on the training process, Kathy did have her doubts about being able to multi-talk at the level expected by NTI. As challenging as it has been, she feels she has successfully acclimated to the accuracy and speed of NTI. “I still have days where I feel like my brain can’t keep up with my fingers or my concentration is absolutely non-existent, but I have to say I work with such a wonderful team and I’m lucky to have a very supportive supervisor,” says Kathy. “My colleagues are great teammates. They have my back and I have theirs. My supervisor tells me like it is and I appreciate the honesty. I love working with genuine people, especially when working in an online environment. Problems are solved quicker and assignments are completed fast and fairly. Having such a positive work environment has made a significant impact on my wellness.”

Press Release - People with Disabilities and Disabled Veteran’s Expo | NTI


Press Release - People with Disabilities and Disabled Veteran’s Expo | NTI

For Release Wednesday, May 9, 2016 at 12:00 p.m.

[Boston, MA] - NTI Exhibits at Washington, DC Career Expo for People with Disabilities

National Telecommuting Institute (NTI) will be an exhibitor at the CAREERS & the disABLED Magazine's  Career Expo for People with Disabilities at the Ronald Reagan Building in Washington, DC on Friday, May 13, 2016 from 10 a.m. - 3 p.m.

The Career Expo brings together industry and government with Americans  with disabilities who are entry level and professionals in all career disciplines.

Free and open to the public, this special event allows attendees to meet representatives from Fortune 500 companies, Government agencies and nonprofit organizations, including NTI, who want to help attendees find new jobs. Exhibitors at the Career Expo include Wells Fargo, BAE Systems, Deloitte, National Security Agency; and so many more. 

Attendance is free, but pre-registration is advised at http://www.eop.com/expo .
National Telecommuting Institute, NTI was founded in 1995 as a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, NTI pursued a mission to identify and develop work-at-home jobs for home-based Americans who are physically disabled.

Since that time, NTI has provided trained work-at-home employees to some of the largest U.S. government agencies, Fortune 500 companies and to smaller businesses who want to outsource customer service and technical support operations in order to reduce costs.

Visit  www.nticentral.org/learnmore for more information about how NTI assists American veterans who are disabled in their job searches.

Huntington’s Awareness! Who Will Your Conversation Be @?


Huntington’s Awareness! Who Will Your Conversation Be @?



The month of May is Huntington’s Disease Awareness Month. Raise awareness to hunt for the cure to stop Huntington’s and educate others on the disease. Huntington’s Disease (HD) is an incurable genetic disorder and no treatment exists for it. HD causes nerve cells to breakdown and deteriorate. The disease affects a person's ability to think, reason, talk, and walk. Some say that it is a disease that is similar to both the effects of ALS and Parkinson’s Disease combined.


Here are a few statistics surrounding HD:
  • 30,000 Americans currently have HD
  • Choking is a major symptom of HD in it’s earliest stages
  • HD is genetic
  • HD is the result of gene which causes the faulty development of the protein huntingtin (not a typo)
  • Affects both men and women equally
  • Over 200,000 Americans are at risk of developing HD

Educate others through your own knowledge knowledge, experiences and imagery. In the picture seen here is a brain in the shape of a word bubble. The reason for the @ symbol in the middle is because of it’s visual similarity to a part of the brain called the basil ganglia, which plays a key role in behavior and movement and is the most prominently affected portion of the brain from Huntington’s Disease. So raise awareness by tagging someone below.  Who will your conversation be @?


#HUNT4HUNT #huntingtons #als #parkinsons #disability #disabilityawareness #huntingtonsawareness #huntingtonsawarenessmonth #may #mayawareness #awarenessmonth #alsawareness #icebucketchallenge #brain #illustration #vector #vectorart #causes #hope #love #educate #hdawareness #hdmonth #hdweek #hd #cure #letstalkabouthd #CureHD #huntingtonsdisease 




Mike Sanders is the Director of Marketing and Communication for NTI. In the past, Mike was the Manager of Training for Canon North America, worked for a few Financial Firms, and has built Interactive media, Websites and Learning Management Systems for several Fortune 500 firms and start-ups. Connect with him on LinkedIn and while you are at it, view our artwork on Instagram (5K users strong).

National Military Spouse Appreciation Day


National Military Spouse Appreciation Day

By Mary E. Hart

Today, May 6, is National Military Spouse Appreciation Day. It’s the day when military spouses are commended for the sacrifices they’ve made for their families, along with the love and support they provide before, throughout, and after their spouse’s service to our country. President Ronald Reagan started the idea back in 1994, and then the Friday before Mother’s Day was officially deemed “Military Spouse Appreciation Day” by Congress and the Department of Defense in 1999.



No one knows the life of a military spouse better than other military spouses, and on this day, we want to recognize one of them who works as an advocate for military families: Erica Zeiger, who is the Director of Operations for the Massachusetts Soldiers Legacy Fund and is herself a military spouse. Her husband was an active duty airman, who retired in 2010 but continues to work at Hanscom Air Force Base. 



Michael Sanders, Director of Marketing here at the National Telecommunications Institute (NTI) had a chance to speak with Erica and find out more about the Massachusetts Soldiers Legacy Fund (MSLF). The recording of their conversation is included here. 




Take a listen to Michael and Erica’s conversation to learn about the history of the MSLF and the support they’ve given to children of Massachusetts residents who passed away in service in Iraq. The work performed by MSLF is truly heart-warming knowing that the educational grants they provide to these children are in honor of their parents’ service to our country. The organization also hosts events, including an annual Fun Day at Kimball’s Farm, to bring Gold Star families together to support each other and have fun. Click the image below to see the most recent event!

http://www.wcvb.com/news/kids-enjoy-wcvb-take-your-kids-to-work-day/39267536


If you’d like to contribute to the Massachusetts Soldiers Legacy Fund after listening to this conversation or reading this blog, you can reach out to Erica at info@mslfund.org or go to the website http://www.mslfund.org/donate.html




- See more at: http://blog.nticentral.org/#sthash.kZFM8psE.dpuf
Mary E. Hart is the Digital Communications Specialist for NTI. She is also a freelance writer, editor and content strategist, specializing in writing copy that will get stuck in your head like an earworm, prompting you to take action. Previously, she worked in Demand Generation marketing for UBM Tech and Ziff Davis Enterprise. In her spare time, Mary is working on the next great novel.

National Take Your Daughters and Sons to Work Day


National Take Your Daughters and Sons to Work Day

By Mary E. Hart



Today, April 28, is National Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work® Day. Take Our Daughters to Work was created 23 years ago by Marie Wilson to allow and actually welcome daughters to spend the day at a parent’s workplace. Sons were added to this tradition in 2003.

For some parents, though, Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day is more than just one day during the year. Think about when your child is sick or school is closed for the day (be it for snow or any other reason) or it’s summer time, but you can’t afford day camp or it hasn’t yet started. What do parents do then? Either they take their daughter or son to work with them and set them up in their office, a vacant cube or conference room or, if they’re able to do so, they work from home that day.

Over the years, I’ve been very lucky to be able to work from home when needed and even worked from home full-time for four years and again now. That made it very easy to keep my son home if he wasn’t feeling well -- which was very common in his first days of daycare and school -- or if there was a snow day or a half day at school. Instead of rushing around trying to figure out who would be picking him up or who would stay home with him, it fell to me by default. I’d rearrange any phone meetings that I had if he was home sick to make sure I’d be able to take care of him. If a meeting couldn’t be rescheduled, I would just hope for the mute button to work if I had to rush him to the bathroom.

When my son was younger, I’d wind up doing a lot of work on any day he was home during his nap or after he went to sleep for the night and off and on during the actual day while he was feeling okay for the moment or was glued to the TV (thank you to the movie “Cars” and “Happy Feet” for keeping him entertained back then). But if he was feeling fine and school was just closed, often, I’d find that he and his sock monkey would find their way into my office as the sock monkey also wanted to “work”, which entailed sitting on my lap and typing away on my keyboard. Luckily, none of those sock monkey-typed spreadsheets nor emails made their way past my own computer because my bosses would have thought I was the one who was sick.

These days were precious to me because it showed my son a bit more about what I actually do while he’s at school. I’m sure he thought I was just watching TV all day (oh, no…) And he got a glimpse into work calls and what goes on when he was in his room playing and could hear me right down the hallway on the phone for a meeting. On many of these days, we also talked about what his dad does, too and how the jobs were different, so it showed our son that there are a number of different paths he can take career-wise. 
Now that my son is older, his days of being out sick are less (let’s hope I didn’t just jinx myself typing that!) and when he is home for whatever reason, his video games keep him entertained while I take calls and write blogs like this one.

As parents, we all do what we can to make this whole thing work. I’m hopeful that more and more companies will start to understand the challenges that all workers face in their day to day lives, be it needing to be home with a sick child or working flexible hours while still getting everything done -- just not in the normal 9 to 5 (although exactly how normal are those hours these days? That’s a whole different blog post) workday.




- See more at: http://blog.nticentral.org/#sthash.kZFM8psE.dpuf
Mary E. Hart is the Digital Communications Specialist for NTI. She is also a freelance writer, editor and content strategist, specializing in writing copy that will get stuck in your head like an earworm, prompting you to take action. Previously, she worked in Demand Generation marketing for UBM Tech and Ziff Davis Enterprise. In her spare time, Mary is working on the next great novel.

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