PTSD Awareness Day


Starting in 2010, Congress named June 27th PTSD Awareness Day. In 2014, the Senate designated the full month of June for National PTSD Awareness.



What is PTSD?

PTSD (posttraumatic stress disorder) is a mental health problem that some people develop after experiencing or witnessing a life-threatening event, like combat, a natural disaster, a car accident, or sexual assault.

Any experience that threatens your life or someone else’s can cause PTSD. These types of events are sometimes called trauma.

Types of traumatic events that can cause PTSD include:

  • Combat and other military experiences
  • Sexual or physical assault
  • Learning about the violent or accidental death or injury of a loved one
  • Child sexual or physical abuse
  • Serious accidents, like a car wreck
  • Natural disasters, like a fire, tornado, hurricane, flood, or earthquake
  • Terrorist attacks

During this kind of event, you may not have any control over what’s happening, and you may feel very afraid. Anyone who has gone through something like this can develop PTSD.
There are some things that make it more likely you’ll develop PTSD — for example, having very intense or long-lasting trauma, getting hurt or having a strong reaction to the event (like shaking, throwing up, or feeling distant from your surroundings).

It’s also more common to develop PTSD after certain types of trauma, like combat and sexual assault. But there’s no way to know for sure who will develop PTSD.

What are the symptoms?

There are 4 types of PTSD symptoms, but they may not be exactly the same for everyone. Each person experiences symptoms in their own way.

  1. Reliving the event
  2. Avoiding things that remind you of the event
  3. Having more negative thoughts and feelings than before
  4. Feeling on edge


Simple Screening

Only a mental health or medical professional can tell you if you have PTSD. If you went through a trauma and answer “yes” to at least three of the questions below, you should have a PTSD evaluation.
In your life, have you ever had any experience that was so frightening, horrible, or upsetting that, in the past month, you:

  1. Have had nightmares about the experience or thought about it when you did not want to?
  2. Tried hard not to think about the experience or avoided situations that reminded you of it?
  3. Were constantly on guard, watchful, or easily startled?
  4. Felt numb or detached from others, activities, or your surroundings?

If you answered “yes” to 3 or more of these questions, talk to a mental health care provider to learn more about PTSD and PTSD treatment. Answering “yes” to 3 or more questions does not mean you have PTSD. Only a mental health care provider can tell you for sure.

Getting Back into the Workplace

Those with PTSD may need guidance back into the workplace.  This is where NTI can help.  At NTI we help individuals with disabilities back into the workplace. We have mentors on our staff to guide you through the process to get you back to work once again.  If you would like to give our non-profit a try and learn more about our services, register at NTI here: https://goo.gl/6rkvC4

Statistics:

Going through a traumatic event is not rare. At least half of Americans have had a traumatic event in their lives. Of people who have had trauma, about 1 in 10 men and 2 in 10 women will develop PTSD.


  • 70% of adults in the U.S. have experienced some type of traumatic event at least once in their lives. This equates to approximately 223.4 million people.
  • Up to 20% of these people go on to develop PTSD. As of today, that equates to approximately 44.7 million people who were or are struggling with PTSD.
  • An estimated 8% of Americans − 24.4 million people − have PTSD at any given time. That is equal to the total population of Texas.
  • An estimated one out of every nine women develops PTSD, making them about twice as likely as men.


Resources:

For more information and resources visit the National Center for PTSD website at:
www.ptsd.va.gov
http://www.ptsdinfo.org/
https://www.helpguide.org/
http://www.everydayhealth.com/ptsd/guide/resources/



June is PTSD Awareness Month


One mental health problem plaguing over 5 million persons of all ages in the United States, young and old is P.T.S.D. or Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. An estimated 8% of Americans – that's 24.4 million people – have PTSD at any given time. An estimated 1 out of 10 women develop PTSD; women are about twice as likely as men. Among people who are victims of a severe traumatic experience 60 – 80% will develop PTSD. This disorder is developed after witnessing a life-threatening event. This could be witnessing a major crime in progress, suffering any type of abuse or soldiers after military combat. 

As a child, I encountered a situation whereby I developed PTSD. Even many years later, I can be reminded of the event, which causes me to experience a lot of anxiety.  There are different types of treatment available, psychotherapy and medication. I have taken advantage of counseling and I take medication for my P.T.S.D. This treatment really helps and being around positive people really helps as well. 



Find out more about PTSD on the National Center for PTSD website

Also, if you are SSI or SSDI and would like to find out how NTI helps those with PTSD back into the workplace, register for our job placement services.


About the Author



This article was written by NTI's eMentor, Billie Lynn Holt.  Billie has been a valuable asset in guiding candidates through NTI's process from the point of registration to hiring.  She was born into a military family in Germany, enjoys traveling and learning about the world. Billie has 4 children and 1 grandchild whom she adores  She loves music, people, art, sports, and working out. Staying positive is the best advice she can give.

World No Tobacco Day

Snap out of it! World No Tobacco Day illustrates the dangers of the tobacco industry’s attitudes to the health and economic welfare of those who smoke. World No Tobacco Day encourages health and improvement in communities worldwide by challenging the worldwide tobacco crisis.



I am a reformed smoker.  I have not smoked in over 10 years.  Smoking cigarettes results in an addiction to nicotine and is the main cause of Lung cancer, and many other diseases.  Second-hand smoke affects others that don’t even smoke cigarettes.  It causes a stale odor in your home, clothing, and your hair.  Unfortunately, when you are a smoker, you become somewhat insusceptible to the health issues associated with smoking, not to mention unsightly odor.  

I was a heavy smoker (i.e. “Mad Men” all day, every day), and it was hard to stop.  I actually stopped at least 3 to 4 times before I actually stopped for good.  I tried the gum, several natural ways like chewing on whole cloves, whole cinnamon sticks, and lastly a prescription drug.  Although my close friends would encourage me to stop, I was never ostracized because of my habit.  As a non-smoker now, I try to extend the same to others who still smoke. 

World No Tobacco Day is conducted by the United Nations, World Health Organization (WHO).  They report risks of consuming tobacco and make individuals mindful of the industry practices of tobacco businesses. Tobacco is a billion dollar industry that contributes to six million deaths a year worldwide. Although, portrayed a something cool to do, it isn't, not to mention, it is expensive and highly addictive.  So be cool at something else!!! The message starts with you!

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About the Author
This article was written by NTI's Financial Administrator, Trudy Sirles.  Trudy has been a valuable asset in facilitating individuals through their individual work plans through the the Ticket to Work program.  In addition,  Trudy guides candidates through the background processes at NTI. 

Kidney Health Week

It's Kidney Health Week and the theme is obesity.  Kidneys filter waste products from the blood. They also have to do with regulating blood pressure, electrolyte balance and red blood cell production. Symptoms of kidney failure may not be noticeable. There are numerous causes of kidney failure and depending on the situation may be irreversible.  



More than 650,000 patients per year in the United States and an estimated 2 million patients worldwide are affected by end-stage renal disease (ESRD). ESRD is increasing in the United States by 5% per year. The need for donor kidneys in the United States is rising at 8% per year. Some of the warning signs of kidney disease are: high blood pressure, blood and/or protein in the urine, a BUN (Blood Urea Nitrogen) test outside the normal range, GFR (glomerular filtration rate) less than .60, frequent urination, puffiness around the eyes and swelling of the hands or feet. The treatment options for kidney failure are hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, or kidney transplantation. Kidney transplants have a high success rate. The kidney could come from basically anyone who matches the recipient and is in need of the kidney.  





Other kidney diseases can be treated successfully without having to resort to dialysis or transplant.  The most at risk for kidney disease are those who are older, have diabetes, high blood pressure, have a family member already diagnosed with kidney disease, and a member of African-American, Hispanic American, Asian America, Pacific Islander or American Indian. 




One way to get involved with lifesaving programs that educate and support patients and their families is to participate in the Kidney Walk sponsored by the National Kidney Foundation.  More than .80 cents of every dollar goes to directly support programs and services for those in need of the National Kidney Foundation. 




Another way to get involved in National Kidney Week is by supporting NTI. NTI helps Americans with Disabilities and Disabled Veterans back into the workplace. Over the years, NTI has supported those with Kidney problems back into the workplace. If you know of someone who is on SSI or SSDI and looking for telecommuting work, NTI can help.  Have them visit our site here. https://goo.gl/LbrWy1

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About the Author

This article was written by NTI's eMentor, Billie Lynn Holt.  Billie has been a valuable asset in guiding candidates through NTI's process from the point of registration to hiring.  She was born into a military family in Germany, enjoys traveling and learning about the world. Billie has 4 children and 1 grandchild whom she adores  She loves music, people, art, sports, and working out. Staying positive is the best advice she can give.

A High Five to Amber, NTI’s eMentor

This past week was National High Five Day and Get to Know Your Customers Day.  We want to give all our customers; employees, candidates, and clients high fives today. It’s important to appreciate what you have when you have it and give out a high five when it’s well-deserved. At NTI our eMentors work tirelessly to get to know our candidates to help better serve them to deliver and get to know their customers. One of our employees we would like to spotlight is our very own Amber, who is a remote employee from Arkansas.  She used to work on our IRS project and has now transitioned over to working directly at NTI, guiding individuals back to work once again in the role of an eMentor. 




A few of you virtually met Amber as she guided one of Suitable Technologies robots through the halls of the Prudential Center in Boston to celebrate the United Nations  International Day of Persons with Disabilities and to honor NTI in their efforts helping individuals with disabilities. We hope that you enjoy the video Amber recorded for us on the spot that day. For those of you who haven’t met Amber yet, Amber Clary is one of NTI’s very first eMentors. She has always been described as a compulsive cheerleader. Her passion is tied to her work every day as she guides NTI candidates through the job training process, job application process, and working for a client. 


video


To get there, Amber explained that Lynda Gardner, Director of eMentoring, made sure that each eMentor got to know each supervisor in all of NTI’s departments, along with frequent department meetings to keep the eMentors informed and up to date. “You have to stay on top of things,” Amber said in an interview in January, “everything is always changing, each department, what their improvements are, and how you will then handle things in your own process.”

eMentors are quintessential for NTI and candidates to achieve their goal. It is our eMentors that guide candidates along the many steps that follow in the NTI process and returning to the workforce and becoming more financially independent again.  Amber remembers starting as an eMentor at NTI and describes it in the interview. “First starting, you know when you start a new position you kinda have butterflies in your stomach, you want to do the best you can, you want to be what these people need.”




Amber describes the work her fellow eMentors and herself do in an e-mail, “Guiding a candidate to the next step is just that. The eMentors do not take away the responsibility of the candidate to go through the process. We cannot put forth the effort for you. But we can be an invaluable tool so that at all times during the process you will know what to do, and who to contact. Therefore, we will guide you in where to expend that effort so that you can successfully reach your goal of finding and obtaining employment.” 

As for NTI, we would like to guide you through your job journey.  If you are on SSI or SSDI and would like to get back into the workplace, feel free to register for our job placement services at www.nticentral.org/Learnmore.  Our registration process is new and has been reduced from 22 minutes down to 3 minutes in order to sign up! Still, even though the process has changed, you still have the great services of our eMentors in guiding you back into the workplace.   

As an end note, Amber has been spotlighted in this post, but over the next few weeks, we are going to be highlighting the other eMentors who have brought so much to the lives of Americans with Disabilities nationwide. 
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Amber Clary, originally from Texas, currently lives with her dog Timber in Arkansas. Amber volunteered as a teacher in her community for 12 years, which taught her about people, and how to relate to different personality types. That experience helps her thrive today as an eMentor for NTI. She also worked with one of NTI’s clients, the IRS, for three years. Nothing has felt more fitting to Amber than her eMentor position, which she started in July 2016.


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